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Engineering & Science Opportunities

Engineering & Science Opportunities

LEVEL RESULTS SHOW GIRLS ARE ENTHUSIASTIC ABOUT A CAREER IN SCIENCE, ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY
In the wake of A Level results released today, the lead Government body on gender equality in science, engineering and technology has called for employers and universities to ensure that high achieving girls go on to be a success in science, engineering and technology (SET) careers.
Girls outperformed boys in some subjects which traditionally lead to a career in male-dominated industries. As a percentage of new A* grades achieved, girls did better than boys in biology, ICT, physics and technology, and overall there was an increase in girls taking physics, maths, further maths, chemistry and biology compared to 2009’s results.
Jane Clarke, assistant director at The UKRC, the Government’s lead body for advancing gender equality in SET, is delighted with the results. She said:  “16.8 percent more girls have taken science and maths subjects since 2005, a higher proportional increase than boys, so the message that a career in SET can be fulfilling and crucially ‘for girls’ finally seems to be getting through. Women are still underrepresented in these vital growth industries, but these results show that they continue to get the right qualifications. It is now a question of universities retaining their interest in SET subjects and highlighting career pathways into fulfilling SET jobs. In addition, more employers need to create an environment where women feel comfortable enough to enjoy a long and successful career.”
“It is very encouraging indeed to see that girls continue to be interested in A level subjects that can lead to a career in the SET sectors, such as mathematics, further mathematics, ICT and technology. The gap in overall participation levels is closing but computing (8.9 percent female entries) and physics (21.5 percent female entries) are clearly not appealing to young women and that needs to change. The challenge is to break down gender barriers and ensure girls know there is a career path from all of these SET subjects into exciting jobs in science, engineering and technology after education.”

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